Take one large basement, add oodles of bright white vertical growing units, plant all manner of yummy herbs and nutritious greens. Wait a couple weeks and open the doors of your uber fresh produce store where customers select food straight off the farm. Goodness grows below ground.

That’s exactly what one man did in British Columbia, and its the cleanest farm you’ll ever visit. Vancouver’s new Living Produce Aisle is a fresh concept; one that has those who love just cut herbs, micro greens and sprouts happily heading for the subterranean experience on East Cordoba Street. Owner, Tarran Wolfe will soon be adding raw food smoothies, wheat grass shots and a gourmet salad to the truly green grocer’s offerings.

Granted, Wolfe got an excellent buy on his hydroponics units through his other business, an indoor gardening shop. His rent is easy to swing too. The landlord upstairs is a pizza & pasta restaurant who prefer a constant supply of fresh basil and arugula to cash. It’s an arrangement for the good of all. It boosts the local economy, provides an excellent source of good for you food and flavors, reduces the area’s carbon footprint and lowers the cost of fresh produce for both eateries and households.

 

Known as the Urban Cultivator, these commercial units and smaller versions for home use are available for purchasing. You could do far more than super fast growing microgreens and lettuces. Every city should have food this fresh year around without importing it.

Source: Vancouver News

 

Tammy Clayton

Content crafter and Senior Editor at Garden Culture Magazine
Tammy has been immersed in the world of plants and growing since her first job as an assistant weeder at the tender age of 8. Heavily influenced by a former life as a landscape designer and nursery owner, she swears good looking plants follow her home. (Some feel she's got a perennial obsession, others say the problem is tomato plants.)

If you don't find her at the desk - check the gardens. When not writing and weeding, she enjoys a good book, painting junk furniture, and blending the harvest of heirloom tomatoes and chiles into salsas.